books and reading · reviews

What I Read this Week

These are the things I read this week:

32600769The Blinds by Adam Sternbergh: Former criminals live in an isolated town in Texas, in a sort of social experiment where none of the criminals can remember their pasts or their crimes, but they know that they have chosen this life instead of a life in prison. Sheriff Calvin Cooper keeps the peace in the town, where they’ve never had any violence in eight years. Until someone turns up dead. And then another person turns up dead, too.

A smart, twisty little western that kept me guessing, I enjoyed this one as a whole. It’s told through multiple perspectives, which helps readers get a sense of the town, but it never allows the reader to get very close to any of the characters, which is intentional. This was a read out of my comfort zone, and I liked it.

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Young Jane Young by Gabrielle Zevin: Aviva Grossman gets involved with a very married much older congressman when she’s still in college. The affair is revealed, and she becomes a social pariah, unable to find work. So she changes her name and moves far away to start a new life as a wedding planner in Maine. Raising her 13-year-old daughter Ruby on her own, she decides to run for office, and that’s when all her secrets are revealed.

I really liked this one–I read it in a day–but the first part of the book is by far the strongest section. Told in alternating narratives by four very different women, it’s a quick, captivating read about sexism, feminism, slut shaming, and much more. I really enjoyed the hell out of this book.

5Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J.K. Rowling: Harry’s third year at Hogwarts is marked by increased security in the form of dementors, after notorious wizard Sirius Black escapes from the wizard prison. Everyone is sure Sirius is after Harry, but Harry realizes that Sirius might have answers about his past.

This has always been my least favorite of all the Harry Potter books, and it remains so to this day. While I enjoyed Jim Dale’s narration of it, it’s still the book I feel the least connected to. I’m not sure if I don’t think the rising action is nearly as compelling as the other books or if I just don’t care about all the animal stuff (which is a departure for me), but I always rush through this one to get to the good stuff later on.

I Hate Everyone But You by Gaby Dunn and Alison Raskin: Ava and Gen are best 33916153friends headed off for their first year of college on opposite sides of the country. The book chronicles their first semester through texts and emails as each girl explores newfound independence, college experiences, and new relationships. Can their friendship survive the distance and different experiences?

Told entirely through texts and emails, this frenetic (there’s literally no other word for the pacing and tone of this one) book about two best friends has some really authentic (read: self-absorbed and completely obnoxious) narrators, and some interesting things to say about the complexities of female friendship, but it’s also a pretty surface-level novel. I have complicated feelings about it.

What did you read this week?

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books and reading

What I Read This Week

Another slow week for me. Here’s what I read this week:

31931941Eliza and Her Monsters by Francesca Zappia: Eliza Mirk is shy to the point of being friendless. But that’s in the real world, because in the online world, she has friends. And she’s Lady Constellation, the author of the super popular webcomic Monstrous Sea. When new kid Wallace Warland enters her life, she realizes he’s the author of the most popular Monstrous Sea fanfic around. And the two become friends, but she can’t seem to bring herself to tell him who she is.

I was surprised by how much I loved this one. Sweet and funny, with serious respect for the world of fandom, I devoured this in just a couple sittings. Definitely one of the best YA books of the year.

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by J.K. Rowling: Harry’s second year at15881 Hogwarts is marked by mysterious whispering from something in the walls, people are turning up petrified solid, and there’s the mystery of the diary that seems to be blank until it isn’t. But who is the heir of Slytherin, and how is the chamber opening again?

I’ve been listening to the Harry Potter books on audiobook, and they aren’t disappointing this time around. It’s been years since I listened to Jim Dale’s narration, and it’s like delicious comfort food. One of my least favorites of the series, I actually enjoyed it this time around, but I can’t wait to get further into the series.

9303735Backstage Pass by Olivia Cunning: Brian Sinclair hasn’t written new music in months. His band, Sinners on Fire, needs new tunes to entertain their fans, but he’s blocked. Then he meets Myrna, a sex psychologist, and the two have steamy encounters that ignite his muse. But she’s not looking to for a relationship, and he’s on the road constantly.

Pure erotica garbage. It’s not particularly well written, the characterization is a mess, and there’s no actual story here, but I couldn’t stop reading it because it was so silly.

books and reading

What I Read this Week

I didn’t get nearly as much reading done over the long weekend. But here’s what I read this week:

18060008Under the Egg by Laura Marx Fitzgerald:  Theodora spills a bottle of rubbing alcohol on her dead grandfather’s painting, and she discovers what appears to be a Renaissance masterpiece underneath the old paint. It could be great news for Theo, who is struggling to keep her old house in working order and support her loose-cannon mother, but it could also mean she’s in possession of a stolen work of art. With the help of some new friends, Theo unravels the mystery of the painting as well as her grandfather’s life.

I really enjoyed this story of a 13-year-old girl who’s resourceful and plucky. There’s a lot of good stuff here, including some World War II history, a love song to the city of New York, a dash of art history, and some quirky characters. The audiobook narration was great, and I can see this having appeal to a lot of middle grade readers.

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Little & Lion by Brandy Colbert:  Suzette is back at home for the summer after a year away at boarding school. Although she’s dealing with some personal issues of her own, she knows that her step brother, Lionel, needs her emotional support. This is especially true when he tells her he’s gone off his bi-polar meds. But things get extra complicated when Suzette finds herself falling for the same girl that her brother has started to date.

I feel like I’ve been waiting for a new Brandy Colbert book forever, and this one was worth the wait in many ways. A deft exploration of sexual identity as well as the complicated bonds of blended families, I really enjoyed this slow-burn of a book. There’s a lot to like here, and it’s one that should find an audience with adults and teens alike.

25701463You’re Welcome, Universe by Whitney Gardner: Julia’s supposed best friend turns her in for covering up a slur with a beautiful graffiti mural. She gets expelled from her Deaf school, and ends up mainstreamed at a school in the suburbs. Angry, isolated, and unwilling to give up her love of street art, Julia has to contend with the fact that some other street artist is answering her pieces–or destroying them. But who?

I loved this ode to street art and Deaf culture. Julia is a super prickly character, and a lot of readers are going to have a hard time with her, but I thought she was great, with an authentic voice. This one reminded me a great deal of Switched at Birth, so it might be a great readalike for fans of the show.

What did you read this week?

 

books and reading · reviews

Book Review: El Deafo by Cece Bell

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Cece is about to start a new school, one where all the other kids aren’t deaf like she is. She’s got her Phonic Ear to help her hear her teacher during class, but she’s sure everyone is staring at the wires that come with it. When she discovers that the Phonic Ear allows her to hear her teacher no matter where she is in the school building, she realizes she’s been granted a rare, special power. She hopes this will be the thing that will help her make a real, true friend.

Cece Bell’s graphic novel is part fiction, part memoir, and it’s full of humor and heart with tons of kid appeal. Bell’s book features brightly colored illustrations, smart text, and a fast-paced plot that will keep readers turn the pages as they travel along with Cece as she navigates the hearing world.

There’s lots of issues explored within the pages of this novel, including finding friendship, being lonely, feeling different, and navigating the painful process of growing up.  Tons of kids will relate to the insecurities Cece faces, and she provides smart insight into the issues without ever crossing over into didacticism.

The graphic aspect of the novel allows her to play around with how she experiences the world as a deaf person, and how she might mishear those around her.  The result is a successful visual exploration of Cece’s deafness, and one that hearing kids will be able to grasp more fully.

Recommended. It’s an award winner and runner-up for a reason.

El Deafo by Cece Bell. Amulet/Abrams: 2014. Library copy.

 

books and reading

Read-alikes: Books About Ghosts, Pumpkins, and Skeletons

It’s the time of year when everyone wants a good scary read. Of course, not everyone defines “scary” the same way. I’ve had a lot of people come up to the desk lately asking for good scary reads, and I’ve had to help them narrow down exactly what they were looking for.

One elementary school kid came up and said he wanted “scary books” about ghosts, pumpkins, and skeletons.”  After some creative searching, I helped him find a couple of things, and then I set about to making a list of possible resources for elementary age readers looking for Halloween-y thrills.

bunnicula.jpgBunnicula by James Howe: Narrated by Harold the dog, this humorous take on a possible vampire-bunny is sure to keep kids glued to the page to find out if Bunnicula is really a vampire or just a normal rabbit. This one has been around since I was in elementary school, but it still sees a fair amount of circulation because it’s clever and timeless and who doesn’t love a good vampire mystery?

A Good Night For Ghosts by Mary Pope Osborne: Part of the good time ghosts.jpgsuper-popular Magic Tree House series, this one features the kids traveling to New Orleans where they discover jazz and also some real ghosts. Great for fans of the series as well as younger readers looking for a good ghost story.

Skeleton Creek by Patrick Carman: Strange things are happening in the town of Skeleton Creek, and Ryan and Sarah are on the case. But Ryan is housebound after an accident, and so the two communicate via written notes and recorded footage on a video camera. The book’s format allows readers to login to designated webpages to see Sarah’s footage, which makes for a mixed media approach to the story.

coralineCoraline by Neil Gaiman: Coraline has always wondered what’s behind the locked door in her house. When she finally opens it, a secret passageway appears that brings her to an apartment that looks just like hers, only different. Here she finds an alternate-universe version of her life, and she realizes things are more sinister than she originally thought. Full of thrills and chills and a bit of humor, Gaiman’s book holds massive appeal to readers–and there’s a movie, too.

The Cavendish Home for Boys and Girls by Claire Legrand: At the Cavendish Home for Girls and Boys, kids learn lessons in a hard way. It isn’t long before Victoria notices that children are either coming back different or not at all. Spooky, smart, and will keep readers up late into the night.

Anything great that I missed? Let me know.

 

 

 

books and reading · reviews

Book Review: Pax by Sara Pennypacker

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Pax is a fox, rescued when he was a tiny kit after his family was killed.  Peter, his “boy,” rescued him. He’s lived in domesticity with Peter ever since, and the two are inseparable.  But war is coming, and Peter’s father has enlisted, which means Peter is being shipped off to live with his grandfather. Pax is left by the side of the road, hundreds of miles from where Peter ends up. Determined to make it back to each other, each one embarks on a journey of self-discovery.

Sara Pennypacker’s moving story about a boy and his fox is a heartbreaking page-turner of a novel.  Interspersed in the beautiful prose are black and white illustrations from Jon Klassen, and these help bring the story right off the page. Told in alternating chapters by both Peter and Pax, the story remains grounded in reality even though one of the book’s narrators is a fox.

Beautifully paced and artfully told, Pennypacker allows the reader insight into the horrors of war not through the eyes of Peter, but through those of Pax, who sees woodland creatures blown up by mines.  The underscoring of how far-reaching the terrors of war can be is done successfully, with subtlety and grace.  Because so few of the characters in the story are actually named, the book feels very much like a fable.

Every moment in this novel feels real, and authentic, and emotionally resonant. It’s a sad story that is also full of hope, and it is one that begs to be read by young readers as well as adults. Kids will want to talk about this one, so be ready for hard questions about life and death, war, and much more.

Highly, highly recommended.

Pax by Sara Pennypacker. Balzer + Bray: 2016. Library copy.

books and reading · reviews

Book Review: The Thing About Jellyfish by Ali Benjamin

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Suzy’s having a pretty rough year. Her best friend died in a tragic drowning accident over the summer, and Suzy becomes convinced that it must have been a rare jellyfish sting that caused it. After all, terrible things don’t just happen for no reason.  Convinced she’s right, Suzy embarks on an extensive research project to prove she’s right, and it culminates with a plan to travel across the world for confirmation of her theory.

Ali Benjamin’s novel about grief and the moving on process holds massive appeal not only for middle grade readers but older ones as well. Told in seven parts, neatly laid out according to the scientific method that Suzy is studying in school, Benjamin allows Suzy to shrewdly analyze both the past and the present.  The result is largely emotional and affecting.  Benjamin writes with a keen eye on the science aspects of her story, but she also shows great care for the emotional development of her characters.

This is not an easy read, but it’s a beautiful one. Zu is a bit of an odd child, and Benjamin lets her be one without judgment and with total authenticity. The book’s final arc subverts reader expectations about what will happen, and the result is satisfyingly realistic. It’s a moving story, and it’s one that younger readers will want to talk about.

Smart, honest, and raw. Recommended.

The Thing About Jellyfish by Ali Benjamin. Little, Brown Books for Young Readers. 2015. Library copy.