books and reading · pop culture

Internet Things I’m Reading and Thinking About this Week

These are the internet stories that got me thinking this week. Without further ado:

Keeping ‘Insecure’ Lit: Cinematographer Ava Berkovsky on Properly Lighting Black Faces (Mic)

Before you scan past this based on the title, it’s worth noting that it’s a very interesting look at what it means to light faces that are darker than white people in movies and TV. It’s especially interesting to read about how little it’s even taught in film school:

“When I was in film school, no one ever talked about lighting nonwhite people,” Berkofsky said in a phone interview with Mic. “There are all these general rules about lighting people of color, like throw green light or amber light at them. It’s weird.” These rules are a start, but they’re far from a complete picture.

Why We Fell for Clean Eating (The Guardian)

This is right in my wheelhouse: an expose about the clean eating movement (which is total crap) and how Instagram has fueled it even as scientists have debunked it. The article also looks at why we were so quick and desperate to believe in the magical properties of clean eating:

Clean eating – whether it is called that or not – is perhaps best seen as a dysfunctional response to a still more dysfunctional food supply: a dream of purity in a toxic world. To walk into a modern western supermarket is to be assailed by aisle upon aisle of salty, oily snacks and sugary cereals, of “bread” that has been neither proved nor fermented, of cheap, sweetened drinks and meat from animals kept in inhumane conditions.

Skip It: Why It’s O.K. to Start a TV Show in the Middle (NYT)

A sweet, light take on why it’s okay to skip ahead to when a TV show gets “good”. The argument is made that it only works for some shows, but in an era when there’s too much good TV for any one person, it’s almost necessary. I admit that I clicked on this article because it had a picture of Buffy, so your mileage may vary:

It’s also misleading to treat most series, even the greats, like fully formed wholes set down according to careful design. TV is an improvisatory art, in which shows shoot a pilot and then beta-test themselves out in public. (A classic example, Mr. Sepinwall notes, is “Seinfeld,” which became great around Season 3.)

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s