books and reading · pop culture

Internet Things I’m Reading and Thinking About This Week

These are the articles that I stumbled across this week:

What are We to do with Cinematic Monuments to the Confederacy? (Vulture)

A thoughtful and thought-provoking piece about the insidiousness of white supremacy and how Gone with the Wind is the best example of how pervasive it is:

Nestled in its visual splendor is a slippery sort of racism that is surprising for what it says, meta-textually, about the ways America has yet to reckon with its second original sin. More than any American film about the Civil War, Gone With the Wind reveals the cunning skill with which white supremacy creates its own myths.

Attacked by Rotten Tomatoes (NYT)

This article actually made me laugh when it quotes Brett Ratner right off the bat about how the website Rotten Tomatoes is to blame for the declining sales and attendance at movie theaters. The rest of the piece takes a really close look at the business of the website and how they create the algorithms of what becomes “fresh” or “rotten”, as well as providing insight into the employees of the website. It’s really interesting, and this part made me laugh, too:

Kersplat: Paramount’s “Baywatch” bombed after arriving to a Tomatometer score of 19, the percentage of reviews the movie received that the site considered positive (36 out of 191). Doug Creutz, a media analyst at Cowen and Company, wrote of the film in a research note, “Our high expectations appear to have been crushed by a 19 Rotten Tomatoes score.”

Like, brah, I saw that movie, and it was fucking terrible. Rotten Tomatoes didn’t make your movie bomb. I promise.

15 Percent? 20 Percent? It Doesn’t Matter Because Tipping Culture is Fundamentally Broken (Mel Magazine)

Minneapolis is starting to see some restaurants discuss doing away with tipping as we also move towards a $15 minimum wage, so this well-written piece about how tipping culture is fundamentally broken is a really interesting insider’s perspective on what’s happening:

This leaves the burden of paying for the expertise and performance of servers and bartenders on the dining public. Or put even more simply: “The restaurant owner has made it the customer’s responsibility to pay its employees,” says Sharon Block, executive director of the The Labor and Worklife Program at Harvard Law School.

Which, when you think about it, is fucked up. Shouldn’t the people whose business I’m helping be successful be responsible for paying me? Not to mention, how can I be rewarded for a stellar job performance if my wages come from people culturally obligated to leave extra money on the table? And what happens when it’s a slow day?

Teaching White Students Taught Me the Difference Between Power and Privilege (Buzzfeed)

A super powerful piece about privilege, power, and race:

…white colleagues routinely put their hands on my back and called me lucky. They meant that Southern black boys like me were more likely to end up incarcerated than working beside wonderful white faculty at so-called elite liberal arts colleges. I looked in the eyes of those colleagues and routinely shook my head. These colleagues were lucky, not simply because their students demanded less of them, nor because their identities were never threatened by security or armed police officers; they were lucky that they got to share professional space with poor young black professors who materially never invested in notions of academic excellence being a stand-in for innocence.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s