Read-alikes: Books About Ghosts, Pumpkins, and Skeletons

It’s the time of year when everyone wants a good scary read. Of course, not everyone defines “scary” the same way. I’ve had a lot of people come up to the desk lately asking for good scary reads, and I’ve had to help them narrow down exactly what they were looking for.

One elementary school kid came up and said he wanted “scary books” about ghosts, pumpkins, and skeletons.”  After some creative searching, I helped him find a couple of things, and then I set about to making a list of possible resources for elementary age readers looking for Halloween-y thrills.

bunnicula.jpgBunnicula by James Howe: Narrated by Harold the dog, this humorous take on a possible vampire-bunny is sure to keep kids glued to the page to find out if Bunnicula is really a vampire or just a normal rabbit. This one has been around since I was in elementary school, but it still sees a fair amount of circulation because it’s clever and timeless and who doesn’t love a good vampire mystery?

A Good Night For Ghosts by Mary Pope Osborne: Part of the good time ghosts.jpgsuper-popular Magic Tree House series, this one features the kids traveling to New Orleans where they discover jazz and also some real ghosts. Great for fans of the series as well as younger readers looking for a good ghost story.

Skeleton Creek by Patrick Carman: Strange things are happening in the town of Skeleton Creek, and Ryan and Sarah are on the case. But Ryan is housebound after an accident, and so the two communicate via written notes and recorded footage on a video camera. The book’s format allows readers to login to designated webpages to see Sarah’s footage, which makes for a mixed media approach to the story.

coralineCoraline by Neil Gaiman: Coraline has always wondered what’s behind the locked door in her house. When she finally opens it, a secret passageway appears that brings her to an apartment that looks just like hers, only different. Here she finds an alternate-universe version of her life, and she realizes things are more sinister than she originally thought. Full of thrills and chills and a bit of humor, Gaiman’s book holds massive appeal to readers–and there’s a movie, too.

The Cavendish Home for Boys and Girls by Claire Legrand: At the Cavendish Home for Girls and Boys, kids learn lessons in a hard way. It isn’t long before Victoria notices that children are either coming back different or not at all. Spooky, smart, and will keep readers up late into the night.

Anything great that I missed? Let me know.

 

 

 

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