What I’m Reading and Thinking About This Week

These are the things I’ve been reading and thinking about this week:

Every Episode of Saved by the Bell, Ranked (Vulture)

So great:

Saved by the Bell is evidence that nostalgia alone can keep a pop-culture artifact’s flame burning endlessly. A monster hit for NBC’s Saturday-morning programming during its run from 1989 to 1993, the teen sitcom featured little in terms of innovation or quality — its plots were well-worn in cliché, the acting ranged from competent to deplorable, there were very few high-wattage guest stars, and the jokes possessed a staleness that Generation X would presumably wretch at a few years later.

Spoiler alert: Jessie’s Song is #1 on the list, as it should be.

Everything You Wanted to Know about Project Greenlight from Effie Brown (Buzzfeed)

This season of Project Greenlight was something to behold.  I loved watching it, and a large part of that was because Effie Brown was so amazing, despite how terrible everyone else was.  This interview with her is very, very telling:

And then I do think a little sugar will get me further. It pisses me off that I have to think that way or do that, because if I were a man, I would not have to, but you know what? I’m not a man. This is where I am right now, and if I want to succeed in this business and do more and tell more authentic stories from the Other, I’m going to have to learn…I’m a hard worker, I bust my ass as a producer, I’m really great at my job, but I have a chip on my shoulder. I am a flawed person in a really difficult situation with other flawed people, and it just happened I have a camera on me, so that’s awesome.

How to Apologize (The Toast)

This is excellent, funny, and a little too real for me at times:

Make a cursory moral self-examination excusing yourself from all responsibility and justifying everything that you did. If this does not work for you, try an exhaustive moral self-examination in which it turns out that not only is everything is your fault, but that you are also responsible for the feelings of everyone around you, and if they experience disappointment or frustration or resentment, it is because of some inner flaw of yours, and it’s up to you to make them feel better.

What got you reading and thinking this week?

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