books and reading

What I Read This Week

This week was a bit of a slog for me. I’m not racing through things, so it was a light week, relatively speaking. Here’s what I read:

1285429Lucy Peale by Colby Rodowsky: After Lucy and her sister meet some boys on the boardwalk at Ocean City, she ends up pregnant after being raped by one of them. Kicked out by her fundamentalist father, she ends up living under the boardwalk until she meets Jake, an aspiring writer who takes her in.  The two form a friendship as she deals with her pregnancy.

I read this book many times as a child, and I had a sudden urge to re-read it recently. I was pissed when I realized I’d gotten rid of my copy, and distraught when I found it’s not in my library system. I had to ILL it, and it was worth it. It’s a strange little book, but I can’t separate my nostalgia from it, so it holds up for me.

The Breakdown by B.A. Paris: Cass saw a car breakdown on a deserted road on her way31450633 home one night and felt guilty when she didn’t stop. She felt much worse when the next morning, she found out the woman in the car had been murdered. But she’s also got problems of her own, like where she put her keys and why she can’t remember inviting people over for dinner. As she grapples with the fact that she might be sinking into early onset dementia.

I listened to this on audio, and it was some hot garbage. I didn’t expect it to be good, but I did expect it to be entertaining, much like Paris’s first effort Behind Closed Doors. It was not. A flimsy plot that doesn’t hold up to literally any scrutiny, a whodunit that’s obvious from the second chapter, and nonexistent character building. It was so DUMB. UGH.

32051305Wedding Toasts I’ll Never Give by Ada Calhoun: Part memoir, part essay collection, Calhoun provides different speeches about marriage. Combining insights from her own marriage as well as information from experts across multiple fields, Calhoun aims to provide “toasts” that would be horrifying to hear at an actual wedding but are full of truths all the same.

Sweet and at times very slight, this was a quick read. Calhoun’s got some interesting insights into the institution, and she’s unflinchingly honest about her own humanness and what that means (sometimes she slips). I had a bit more trouble with the transitions from her personal recollections to the quotes and insights of experts, but on the whole it was an interesting read about marriage.

What did you read this week?

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books and reading · pop culture

Internet Things I’m Reading and Thinking About this Week

These are the internet stories that got me thinking this week. Without further ado:

Keeping ‘Insecure’ Lit: Cinematographer Ava Berkovsky on Properly Lighting Black Faces (Mic)

Before you scan past this based on the title, it’s worth noting that it’s a very interesting look at what it means to light faces that are darker than white people in movies and TV. It’s especially interesting to read about how little it’s even taught in film school:

“When I was in film school, no one ever talked about lighting nonwhite people,” Berkofsky said in a phone interview with Mic. “There are all these general rules about lighting people of color, like throw green light or amber light at them. It’s weird.” These rules are a start, but they’re far from a complete picture.

Why We Fell for Clean Eating (The Guardian)

This is right in my wheelhouse: an expose about the clean eating movement (which is total crap) and how Instagram has fueled it even as scientists have debunked it. The article also looks at why we were so quick and desperate to believe in the magical properties of clean eating:

Clean eating – whether it is called that or not – is perhaps best seen as a dysfunctional response to a still more dysfunctional food supply: a dream of purity in a toxic world. To walk into a modern western supermarket is to be assailed by aisle upon aisle of salty, oily snacks and sugary cereals, of “bread” that has been neither proved nor fermented, of cheap, sweetened drinks and meat from animals kept in inhumane conditions.

Skip It: Why It’s O.K. to Start a TV Show in the Middle (NYT)

A sweet, light take on why it’s okay to skip ahead to when a TV show gets “good”. The argument is made that it only works for some shows, but in an era when there’s too much good TV for any one person, it’s almost necessary. I admit that I clicked on this article because it had a picture of Buffy, so your mileage may vary:

It’s also misleading to treat most series, even the greats, like fully formed wholes set down according to careful design. TV is an improvisatory art, in which shows shoot a pilot and then beta-test themselves out in public. (A classic example, Mr. Sepinwall notes, is “Seinfeld,” which became great around Season 3.)

books and reading · reviews

Book Review: Grit by Gillian French

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Darcy Prentiss lives in rural Maine. When she isn’t raking berries with her sister Mags and cousin Nell, she spends her time drinking and swimming in the quarry. She’s got a reputation, but she also knows how to have a really good time, and her reputation as the town “slut” means that everyone is watching her every move. When someone nominates her for the Bay Festival Princess, Darcy realizes that it might be as a joke–but it might have a more sinister meaning behind, it too. As the summer heats up, so do the secrets that Darcy’s been trying to keep hidden.

Gillian French’s novel about girlhood and sisters and secrets is so gorgeously written that this review could stop right there. But French’s prose is just the tip of the iceberg on this memorable, smart, and captivating book. Darcy’s narration is riveting and real, and she’s a heroine who is flawed but so strong and determined it’s impossible not to root for her even as she makes mistakes.

Secondary characters are also given care and consideration, rounding them out from the caricatures they could easily become in a less gifted writer’s hands. The bonds between Nell and Darcy and Mags are fully realized, and French spends time examining the prickly bonds of sisterhood and family. There’s a lot of exploration of what it is to be a girl in the world, of what it is to be a sexual being, of what it is to be poor.  It’s really excellent.

Although it’s not a straight-up mystery, there are secrets that help propel the narrative forward. French does a beautiful job of weaving hints into the narrative without every being too obtuse nor too obvious, and the result is very satisfying and realistic. Readers will be guessing until the end, and even those who figure it out early will find the ending emotionally resonant. I loved this one. One of my favorite reads of the year.

Grit by Gillian French. Harper Teen: 2017. Library copy.

books and reading · pop culture

Internet Things I’m Reading and Thinking About This Week

These are the articles that I stumbled across this week:

What are We to do with Cinematic Monuments to the Confederacy? (Vulture)

A thoughtful and thought-provoking piece about the insidiousness of white supremacy and how Gone with the Wind is the best example of how pervasive it is:

Nestled in its visual splendor is a slippery sort of racism that is surprising for what it says, meta-textually, about the ways America has yet to reckon with its second original sin. More than any American film about the Civil War, Gone With the Wind reveals the cunning skill with which white supremacy creates its own myths.

Attacked by Rotten Tomatoes (NYT)

This article actually made me laugh when it quotes Brett Ratner right off the bat about how the website Rotten Tomatoes is to blame for the declining sales and attendance at movie theaters. The rest of the piece takes a really close look at the business of the website and how they create the algorithms of what becomes “fresh” or “rotten”, as well as providing insight into the employees of the website. It’s really interesting, and this part made me laugh, too:

Kersplat: Paramount’s “Baywatch” bombed after arriving to a Tomatometer score of 19, the percentage of reviews the movie received that the site considered positive (36 out of 191). Doug Creutz, a media analyst at Cowen and Company, wrote of the film in a research note, “Our high expectations appear to have been crushed by a 19 Rotten Tomatoes score.”

Like, brah, I saw that movie, and it was fucking terrible. Rotten Tomatoes didn’t make your movie bomb. I promise.

15 Percent? 20 Percent? It Doesn’t Matter Because Tipping Culture is Fundamentally Broken (Mel Magazine)

Minneapolis is starting to see some restaurants discuss doing away with tipping as we also move towards a $15 minimum wage, so this well-written piece about how tipping culture is fundamentally broken is a really interesting insider’s perspective on what’s happening:

This leaves the burden of paying for the expertise and performance of servers and bartenders on the dining public. Or put even more simply: “The restaurant owner has made it the customer’s responsibility to pay its employees,” says Sharon Block, executive director of the The Labor and Worklife Program at Harvard Law School.

Which, when you think about it, is fucked up. Shouldn’t the people whose business I’m helping be successful be responsible for paying me? Not to mention, how can I be rewarded for a stellar job performance if my wages come from people culturally obligated to leave extra money on the table? And what happens when it’s a slow day?

Teaching White Students Taught Me the Difference Between Power and Privilege (Buzzfeed)

A super powerful piece about privilege, power, and race:

…white colleagues routinely put their hands on my back and called me lucky. They meant that Southern black boys like me were more likely to end up incarcerated than working beside wonderful white faculty at so-called elite liberal arts colleges. I looked in the eyes of those colleagues and routinely shook my head. These colleagues were lucky, not simply because their students demanded less of them, nor because their identities were never threatened by security or armed police officers; they were lucky that they got to share professional space with poor young black professors who materially never invested in notions of academic excellence being a stand-in for innocence.

books and reading · reviews

Book Review: Made for Love by Alissa Nutting

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Hazel is on the run from her tech-giant CEO husband and has found herself crashing with her elderly father and his lifelike sex doll in his trailer park. Determined to go off the grid after a decade being essentially held prisoner in her husband’s tech compound, Hazel fully immerses herself into a different kind of life, one filled with strange characters.

Nutting’s first novel, the deeply riveting and equally disturbing Tampa, set her up as an author to watch. That novel was excellently plotted, and fully explored the unsettling ideas it put forth. This is not the case with Nutting’s follow-up, which presents a ton of fascinating ideas at the onset and then fails to see any of them through. The result is muddled, disappointing, and a bit boring at times.

Part of the problem lies with Hazel, who never really becomes a fully realized character. Neither does Jasper, a con artist whose freak encounter with a dolphin fundamentally alters his sexual proclivities. It’s hard to connect (ironically, part of Nutting’s central thesis) as a result.

The result is uneven and unsatisfying. While the novel starts with a promising few chapters, it quickly loses its momentum and focus, and the result is disappointing. I can’t wait to see what Nutting does next, but I hope it’s not more of this.

Made for Love by Alissa Nutting. Ecco: 2017. Library copy.

 

books and reading · reviews

Book Review: When Dimple Met Rishi by Sandhya Menon

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Dimple Shah is ready for her college life, and she thinks that a special coding summer course is the thing to give her a leg up when she starts her program in the fall. She’s surprised when her parents agree to it. Enter summer course classmate Rishi Patel, a boy who is a hopeless romantic…and apparently Dimple’s future husband. Unbeknownst to Dimple, both sets of parents have set in motion an arranged marriage for the two. Dimple fights it, but Rishi is actually pretty sweet. Maybe opposites do attract?

Told in alternating chapters, Dimple and Rishi narrate this lighthearted novel about culture and identity. Menon’s book has garnered a great deal of praise, and it’s easy to see why people are attracted to it: she blends Hindi language and traditions into the narrative without it ever feeling jarring, and she manages to distinctly encapsulate the personalities of two very different protagonists. It’s a heartwarming story with a happy ending that many readers will gobble up.

That said, it’s also way, way too long. Nearly every conflict presented in the book is resolved about two-thirds of the way through, leaving readers with another 100 pages where the narrative threads largely unravel. The result is a flabby mess of an ending, and one that could have been avoided with a stronger editing hand. Menon is also a debut author, and there are moments where the prose isn’t nearly as strong as it could be.

There’s a lot to like here, and Menon should be commended for writing about a touchy subject (especially in a YA novel) with such grace and generosity. Menon is an author to watch, because there’s enormous teen appeal here. I just wish it had been more tightly constructed.

When Dimple Met Rishi by Sandhya Menon. Simon Pulse: 2017. Library copy.

books and reading

What I Read this Week

I didn’t get nearly as much reading done over the long weekend. But here’s what I read this week:

18060008Under the Egg by Laura Marx Fitzgerald:  Theodora spills a bottle of rubbing alcohol on her dead grandfather’s painting, and she discovers what appears to be a Renaissance masterpiece underneath the old paint. It could be great news for Theo, who is struggling to keep her old house in working order and support her loose-cannon mother, but it could also mean she’s in possession of a stolen work of art. With the help of some new friends, Theo unravels the mystery of the painting as well as her grandfather’s life.

I really enjoyed this story of a 13-year-old girl who’s resourceful and plucky. There’s a lot of good stuff here, including some World War II history, a love song to the city of New York, a dash of art history, and some quirky characters. The audiobook narration was great, and I can see this having appeal to a lot of middle grade readers.

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Little & Lion by Brandy Colbert:  Suzette is back at home for the summer after a year away at boarding school. Although she’s dealing with some personal issues of her own, she knows that her step brother, Lionel, needs her emotional support. This is especially true when he tells her he’s gone off his bi-polar meds. But things get extra complicated when Suzette finds herself falling for the same girl that her brother has started to date.

I feel like I’ve been waiting for a new Brandy Colbert book forever, and this one was worth the wait in many ways. A deft exploration of sexual identity as well as the complicated bonds of blended families, I really enjoyed this slow-burn of a book. There’s a lot to like here, and it’s one that should find an audience with adults and teens alike.

25701463You’re Welcome, Universe by Whitney Gardner: Julia’s supposed best friend turns her in for covering up a slur with a beautiful graffiti mural. She gets expelled from her Deaf school, and ends up mainstreamed at a school in the suburbs. Angry, isolated, and unwilling to give up her love of street art, Julia has to contend with the fact that some other street artist is answering her pieces–or destroying them. But who?

I loved this ode to street art and Deaf culture. Julia is a super prickly character, and a lot of readers are going to have a hard time with her, but I thought she was great, with an authentic voice. This one reminded me a great deal of Switched at Birth, so it might be a great readalike for fans of the show.

What did you read this week?